Saturday, March 26, 2016

Microagressions

This week we've been studying about microagressions in class.

This is what I've learned about microagressions so far: they are brief everyday indignities, may be verbal, behavioral, or environmental, and are communicated intentionally or unintentionally, contains an insulting message, often causes severe psychological stress or harm, reflect views of inferiority/superiority and inclusions/exclusions, and happen outside the awareness of well-intentioned individuals. That there are 4 major psychological delimas that could occur including: clash of racial realities, unintentional and invisible nature of microagressions, perceived minimal harm of racial microagressions, and "catch-22". And that the 3 forms of  microagression are: microassault, microinsults, microinvalidation. 

So this week I had to pay attention and find a microagression to write about. Well it's Saturday and I'm realizing I do not have a lot of diversity in my everyday interactions in my daily routine. So after discussing with my husband my lack of an example for my blog assignment, he pointed out a scene from a movie we watched last night. 

Last night we watched the movie Peanuts with the kids and in the middle of the movie Charlie Brown gets flustered and tells the girl he likes that his name is Brown Charlie. It was barely a flick on my radar, but Keven said he laughed at it, and then realized what he had really laughed at. After talking about it, he highly considered it a microagression and I didn't even realize it in the slightest, which could prove that it could be considered a microagression because in most cases the person delivering it has no idea they're doing it. 

This past week while studying this aspect of diversity with microagressions and isms, I've realized that I am very aware of gender stereotypes, able-ism, religion-ism, and classism. But I am still not the best at recognizing microagressions with racism, and in a way until I am in the minority of the dominant culture, I probably won't. 

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